The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives)


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It includes links to additional tools and to current projects in the field. National Mentoring Resource Center This comprehensive resource contains a plethora of research-to-practice information, mentoring tools, and program and training materials, as well as free training and technical assistance for programs to integrate evidence-based practices.

It was created as a partnership between the U. Integrating Effective Mentoring Strategies and Services Into Youth Services: Webinar Archive The Department of Labor's webinar on how to develop and implement effective mentoring opportunities within youth services programs is nationally recognized and available for playback.

Department of Labor, is full of information that can help a program either establish a new mentoring program entirely or add a mentoring component to a youth services program that already exists. It is essentially divided into three main sections— the first focuses on creating high-quality mentoring services, the second provides examples of initiatives that grantees have taken, and the third provides a wealth of mentoring resources.

Department of Education's Mentoring Resource Center summarized in a web seminar series. This report summarizes the findings of individual mentoring research studies, shares large-scale conclusions that can be drawn, and links readers to useful resources.

Find and keep a mentor to boost your career: Here's how

Mentoring: At the Crossroads of Education, Business, and Community This report from EY and MENTOR examines the roles of major businesses in collaborating with the non-profit and public sectors to provide youth in their communities with high-quality mentoring opportunities. It explains the potential value businesses and their employees will receive as a result of greater collaboration. To assist with the development of mentoring programs and collaborative relationships, the report offers best practices and then ends with a call to action for businesses to increase support of youth mentoring efforts.

Then, the report gives recommendations to improve the impact of mentoring by engaging community, state, and national partners. A Systematic Assessment of the Evidence This study, conducted by the Association for Psychological Science, is a meta-analysis of 73 independent studies of mentoring programs conducted between It shares conclusions around the effectiveness of mentoring on different aspects of young people's development. It explains research in the field, reflects on the implications of mentoring in afterschool, and provides recommendations to afterschool programs.

It shares the stakeholder input and the research from the Listening Session, and it also provides recommendations that can advance the effectiveness and availability of mentoring for children whose parents are incarcerated. Mentoring Immigrant Youth: A Toolkit for Program Coordinators Applicable to a wide range of categories of immigrant youth, this toolkit contains content on best practices, key strategies, and important considerations for mentoring programs with immigrant youth. It includes tools, trainings, and templates to help organizations tailor programs to meet specific needs of immigrant youth and achieve the most programmatic success.

A Personal Perspective on Mentoring | The Return Of The Mentor | Taylor & Francis Group

The Education Volunteer Call to Action This United Way report highlights research in areas of volunteer reading, volunteer tutoring, and volunteer mentoring. It explains key research and characteristics of effective mentoring, in addition to sharing best practices that have come out of United Way mentoring programs. It sets ethical guidelines for program staff and volunteer mentors to follow in order to curate ethical, meaningful mentoring relationships between volunteers and youth. The Wisdom of Age: A Handbook for Staff This resource from MENTOR serves to equip staff of mentoring programs with the tools and knowledge necessary to most effectively recruit, train, and support mentors over the age of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Volunteers This research report from MENTOR discusses techniques that not only can help programs recruit mentors, but that also assist programs in retaining volunteers for a significant amount of time.


  1. Introduction: Facts about income inequality and its growth over time.
  2. Find and keep a mentor to boost your career: Here's how;
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It discusses the need for long-term volunteers as well as the role motivation plays in retaining volunteers, concluding that it is imperative that the way a program markets itself needs to match what the actual experience will be like in order for volunteers to continue. Mentors are matched with a local mentoring agency in the Pittsburgh area and then paired with a student in sixth, seventh, or eighth grade. Mentors meet their mentee at the student's school.

vinnioskepnutme.tk Also, mentors are trained by their mentoring agency to ensure quality services. Head to their website to learn more! Girls Incorporated of Lynn This non-profit organization in Massachusetts has developed a strong, comprehensive program targeted to at-risk girls. Trained mentoring professionals work with the girls to improve their lives by offering a wide variety of services, from empowerment workshops to STEAM opportunities to literacy training. The afterschool program they created called "Odyssey" specifically equips mentors to provide social and academic support for middle school students through a once a week program.

Email your Out-of-School Time reports, publications, best practices, case studies, blog articles, videos, media mentions, etc. We will contact you if we are featuring your resource in the OST Toolkit.


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  • OK, got it Give me more info. Donate Take Action. Another important finding from our study is that gaps were not, on average, sensitive to the set of changes that may have occurred between and gaps across both types of skills are virtually unchanged compared with the prior generation of students—those who entered school in The only cognitive gap that changed substantially was in reading skills, which increased by about a tenth of a standard deviation. The gaps by SES in mathematics, in approaches to learning as reported by parents, and in self-control as reported by teachers did not change significantly.

    And relative gaps in approaches to learning as reported by teachers and in self-control as reported by parents shrank between and , by about a tenth of a standard deviation.

    Elevator pitch

    This means that there is a substantial set of SES-related factors that are not captured by the traditional covariates used in this study but that are important to understanding how and why gaps develop. Moreover, the capacity for these other factors—child and family characteristics, early education investments, and expectations—to narrow gaps has decreased over time.

    This suggests that, while such activities as parental time spent with children and center-based pre-K programs cushion the negative consequences of growing up in a low-social-class context, they can do only so much, and that the overall toxicity of lacking resources and supports is increasingly hard to compensate for. The resistance of gaps to these controls should thus be a matter of real concern for researchers and policymakers. These troubling trends point to critical implications for policy and for our society: clearly, we are failing to provide the foundational experiences and opportunities that all children need to succeed in school and thrive in life.

    The failure to narrow gaps between and suggests, too, that investments in pre-K programs and other early education and economic supports were insufficient to counter rising rates of poverty and its increasing concentration in neighborhoods where black and Hispanic children tend to live and learn. But there is also good news. The case study review in the previous section of this report explores district-level strategies to address these gaps, strategies that are being implemented in diverse communities across the country.

    The communities studied all employ comprehensive educational approaches that align enriching school strategies with a range of supports for children and their families.

    Key findings

    Their implementation is often guided by holistic data and, to the extent possible, this report provides a summary, as well, of student outcomes, using both traditional academic measures and a broad range of other measures. Parents were more likely in than in to read regularly to their children; to sing to them; to play games with them; and to enroll them in center-based pre-K programs. Key principles that span across the case studies include very early interventions and supports, parental engagement and education, pre-K, kindergarten transitions, whole-child approaches to curricula, and wraparound supports that are sustained through the K—12 years.

    However, despite the abundance of child development information available to researchers and parents—about the serious impacts of child poverty, about what works to counter those effects, about the importance of the first years of life for children, and about the value of education—our data indicate insufficient policy response at all levels of government. Pre-K programs have expanded incrementally and unevenly, with both access and quality still wildly disparate across states and overall availability severely insufficient.

    There is a dearth of home visiting programs and of quality child care Bivens et al. Child poverty has increased see Proctor, Semega, and Kollar for recent trends in child poverty rates.

    And while a growing number of districts have embraced Broader, Bolder approaches, that number is failing to keep up with high and growing need. In sum, it is actually positive, and somewhat impressive, that gaps by and large did not grow in the face of steadily increasing income inequality, compounded by the worst economic crisis in many decades EPI , ; Saez But it is disappointing and troubling that new policy investments made in the previous decade were insufficient to make even a dent in these stubborn gaps.

    We cannot ensure real opportunities for all our children unless we tackle the severe inequities underlying our findings. And while momentum to enact comprehensive and sustained strategies to close gaps is growing, such strategies are not being implemented nearly as quickly as children need them to be. These data on large, stubborn gaps across both traditional cognitive and noncognitive skills should guide the design of education policies at the federal, state, and local levels; the combined resources and support of government at all three levels are needed if we are to tackle these inequalities effectively.

    Looking at these case studies, policymakers can ask: What are the key strategies these communities employed, what main components characterize these strategies, and how did these communities effectively implement the strategies? The latter set of questions is particularly pertinent to issues of scalability, financing, and sustainability, all of which have posed significant challenges for the districts studied and others like them.

    Policymakers can further ask: What other sources or examples might we learn from? Bright Futures affiliates now exist in 50 districts across eight states—and the program continues to grow—offering another set of communities to look to. Also, new opportunities under the Every Student Succeeds Act ESSA —from funding to expand and align early childhood education programs to broader and more supports-based educator- and school-accountability systems—provide another avenue for exploration and educational improvement.

    This is already the focus of states and districts across the country—as well as of education policy nonprofits and associations—and is a focus that has the potential to inspire viable larger-scale models Cook-Harvey et al.

    Peer Mentor Program - Faculty of Arts and Education

    We must take action, in particular, in those areas of policy related to early education in which we have seen little or no progress over the past decade. Quality preschool, among the most-agreed-upon strategies to avert and narrow early gaps, continues to be much talked about but far too little invested in and far too infrequently and shoddily implemented. The advantages of preschool have been known for decades, and significant progress has been made in preschool enrollment over that time; however, preschool enrollment stagnated soon after Barnett et al.

    Altogether, this report adds to the strong evidentiary base that identifies strategies to reduce the education consequences of economic inequality. It also sheds light on the need to conduct further research on the channels that drive or cushion changes in readiness. A close follow-up of these trends in the near future and of the measures adopted to really tackle inequities will not only determine what type of society we will be, but will also say a lot about what type of society we actually are. Her areas of research include analysis of the production of education, returns to education, program evaluation, international comparative education, human development, and cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis in education.

    Freely available

    She holds a Ph. We appreciate the feedback we received from our discussant Richard Todd and from the audience. The authors gratefully acknowledge Rob Grunewald and Milagros Nores for their insightful comments and advice on earlier drafts of the paper. Special gratitude is expressed to Sean Reardon, for his advice and thorough guidance on the sensitivity analyses affecting the measurement of the cognitive skills and their implications for our study, and for sharing useful materials to help test our results.

    We thank Ben Zipperer and Yilin Pan for their advice on issues associated with multiple imputation of missing data.

    The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives) The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives)
    The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives) The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives)
    The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives) The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives)
    The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives) The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives)
    The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives) The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives)
    The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives) The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives)
    The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives) The Return Of The Mentor: Strategies For Workplace Learning (Education Policy Perspectives)

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